GCBC Research Grant Competition 2 (RGC2) Partnership Webinar Series

GCBC Research Grant Competition 2 (RGC2) Partnership Webinar Series

GCBC Research Grant Competition 2 (RGC2) Partnership Webinar Series

The Global Centre on Biodiversity for Climate (GCBC) is thrilled to introduce its second Research Grant Competition (RGC2), which was officially launched on February 5th, 2024. This round invites research applications focusing on ‘Unlocking Nature – Driving innovation in how biodiversity can support climate resilience and sustainable livelihoods through practice and governance.’

Applications are encouraged from different types of Delivery Partners and must be led by an organisation with offices in an ODA-eligible country, or one that forms part of a consortium with organisations that have an office in an ODA-eligible country(ies).

The GCBC seeks to encourage new and innovative partnerships:

• Which are equitable and ensure research is informed by local demand

• Which are inter and transdisciplinary

• Which build research capacity in ODA-eligible countries

If you are seeking new delivery partners for your proposal, register for this upcoming webinar on Wednesday, February 21st which will focus on the Research Grant Competition 2 (RGC2) new partnerships and consortium.

This will be an interactive session. Attendees will be introduced to some principles and examples of good partnerships and consortiums. This will be followed by an opportunity for peer-to-peer sharing to help catalyze new partnerships.

If you are seeking new partners for your project proposal, please be prepared to answer:

• What you could offer a new partnership or consortium

• What you are looking for in a new partner or consortium

This webinar will be offered in two timeslots: 9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. (UTC) and 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. (UTC).

Register here for this webinar on Wednesday, February 21 at 9:00 a.m. UTC

We particularly encourage potential grant applicants from the Global South to attend.

Organisations with a proven track record in addressing poverty reduction, gender equality, and social inclusion within the context of biodiversity conservation are strongly encouraged to apply.

Stay updated on RGC2 and our webinar series by subscribing to the GCBC newsletter on our website or follow us on X at @gcbc_org or on LinkedIn

Related events

GCBC Research Grant Competition 2 (RGC2) Partnership Webinar Series

The Global Centre on Biodiversity for Climate (GCBC) is thrilled to introduce its second Research Grant Competition (RGC2), which was officially launched on February 5th, 2024. This round invites research applications focusing on ‘Unlocking Nature – Driving innovation in how biodiversity can support climate resilience and sustainable livelihoods through practice and governance.’

Applications are encouraged from different types of Delivery Partners and must be led by an organisation with offices in an ODA-eligible country, or one that forms part of a consortium with organisations that have an office in an ODA-eligible country(ies).

The GCBC seeks to encourage new and innovative partnerships:

• Which are equitable and ensure research is informed by local demand

• Which are inter and transdisciplinary

• Which build research capacity in ODA-eligible countries

If you are seeking new delivery partners for your proposal, register for this upcoming webinar on Wednesday, February 21st which will focus on the Research Grant Competition 2 (RGC2) new partnerships and consortium.

This will be an interactive session. Attendees will be introduced to some principles and examples of good partnerships and consortiums. This will be followed by an opportunity for peer-to-peer sharing to help catalyze new partnerships.

If you are seeking new partners for your project proposal, please be prepared to answer:

• What you could offer a new partnership or consortium

• What you are looking for in a new partner or consortium

This webinar will be offered in two timeslots: 9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. UTC and 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. (UTC).

Register here for this webinar on Wednesday, February 21 at 4:00 p.m. UTC

We particularly encourage potential grant applicants from the Global South to attend.

Organisations with a proven track record in addressing poverty reduction, gender equality, and social inclusion within the context of biodiversity conservation are strongly encouraged to apply.

Stay updated on RGC2 and our webinar series by subscribing to the GCBC newsletter on our website or follow us on X at @gcbc_org or on LinkedIn

Related events

GCBC Grant Call 2 Info Webinar series : Session 1 (for Southeast Asia)

Join us online from January 22, 2024 to get all the details you need about the second GCBC Research Grant Call (RGC).

The Global Centre on Biodiversity for Climate (GCBC) is thrilled to introduce its second Research Grant Competition (RGC2), which will be launched in February 2024. This round invites research applications focusing on ‘Unlocking Nature – Driving innovation in how biodiversity can support climate resilience and sustainable livelihoods through practice and governance.’

Leading up to RGC2’s official launch and throughout the application period, potential applicants are invited to join our informative webinars (starting the week of January 22nd 2024). These webinars will delve into the competition theme, outline eligibility criteria, and provide details on RGC2 including the application and evaluation process.

We particularly encourage potential grant applicants from the Global South to attend. Organisations with a proven track record in addressing poverty reduction, gender equality, and social inclusion within the context of biodiversity conservation are strongly encouraged to apply.

This first webinar will take place on Monday, January 22, 2024, and will be on the topic of ” Introducing the RGC2 theme.”

It will be offered in three-time slots to ensure that it is accessible to participants in Southeast Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Latin America.

Southeast Asia: 09:30 a.m. – 10.30 a.m. (UK time)

Sub-Saharan Africa: 12:00 p.m. – 1.00 p.m. (UK time)

Latin America: 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. (UK time)

Register for the first pre-launch webinar here.

Stay updated on RGC2 and our webinar series by subscribing to the GCBC newsletter below, or follow us on X at @gcbc_org or on LinkedIn

Related events

Coming soon in January 2024: GCBC Research Grant Competition 2 Info Webinar series

The Global Centre on Biodiversity for Climate (GCBC) is thrilled to introduce its second Research Grant Competition (RGC2), which will be launched in February 2024. This round invites research applications focusing on ‘Unlocking Nature – Driving innovation in how biodiversity can support climate resilience and sustainable livelihoods through practice and governance.’

Leading up to RGC2’s official launch and throughout the application period, potential applicants are invited to join our informative webinars (starting the week of January 22nd, 2024). These webinars will delve into the competition theme, outline eligibility criteria, and provide details on RGC2 including the application and evaluation process.

Register for the first pre-launch webinar HERE .

We particularly encourage potential grant applicants from the Global South to attend. Organisations with a proven track record in addressing poverty reduction, gender equality, and social inclusion within the context of biodiversity conservation are strongly encouraged to apply.

Stay updated on RGC2 and our webinar series by subscribing to the GCBC newsletter on our website by clicking the subscribe button towards the end of this page, or follow us on X at @gcbc_org or on LinkedIn

Deep-ocean resources and biodiscovery: enabling a sustainable and healthy low-carbon future (DEEPEND project)

Countries: Fiji, Cook Islands

Partners: Natural History Museum, National Oceanography Centre, University of Aberdeen, University of Strathclyde Glasgow, University of Southampton, Pacific: Cook Islands Seabed Minerals Authority, University of the South Pacific, Pacific Community

Summary: The climate change crisis has increased the demand for natural resources, such as lithium, cobalt, and manganese, due to their role in the green energy transition as important components for batteries of electric vehicles. With vast reservoirs of minerals present in the deep sea, mining in our oceans is already being discussed and could start within the next decade, but little is known about the biodiversity and Marine Genetic Resources (MGR) present in these deep-sea regions. DEEPEND looks to develop a long-term project to understand the true value of biodiversity in deep-sea regions at risk from mining and climate change. It utilises molecular approaches to provide fundamental knowledge on biodiversity, explore pharmaceutical applications of deep-sea microbes and invertebrates, inform policy on seabed mining, deliver development outcomes, enable understanding of future climate scenarios and provide long-term research and development value.

Related links: DEEPEND: Deep-ocean resources and biodiscovery | Natural History Museum 

 

Optimising the long-term management of invasive species affecting biodiversity and the rural economy using adaptive management (CONTAIN project)

Countries: Argentina, Brazil, Chile

Partners: UK: University of Aberdeen, Queen’s University Belfast; Latin America: Unesp (São Paulo State University, Brazil), CONICET (Argentina), Centro de Humedales Río Cruces (Chile), Agricultural and Livestock Service – SAG (Chile)

Summary: The CONTAIN project works across the Latin America region with the aim of realising the multiple environmental, social, and economic benefits and co-benefits of managing Invasive Alien Species (IAS) in a cost-effective manner. The project’s objectives are to:

  • Move from efficacy to efficiency when evaluating IAS management, by considering wider costs and benefits associated with each management action, such as those that scale up with the number of invaders and costs associated with ecosystem services changes brought about by IAS.
  • Rigorously evaluate empirically and through modeling under what circumstances invasive trees deliver valuable carbon sequestration ecosystem service that could be traded-off against the loss of carbon above and below ground, by native plant communities, loss of biodiversity, and ecosystem service and resilience. Hence informing a lively ongoing debate on the pros and cons of carbon sequestration by invasive trees, a potential nature-based solution.
  • Evaluate how incentives, compensation for the loss of income, and sources of income may contribute to the sustainability of participatory control of IAS for rural communities so heavily affected by IAS that their livelihoods are in peril.